Producing food for the world’s growing rural and urban populations starts with agricultural land. Reducing current high levels of hunger and malnutrition, as called for by the Sustainable Development Goals, will depend on land use decisions and governance from the global to the local level. Although about 40 percent of the world’s land is used for crop production and pasture [1], today some 800 million people remain food insecure and as many as 2 billion are malnourished [2]. Achieving food security requires physical, social, and economic access to safe and nutritious food. For many people, one or more forms of access are lacking—and in rural areas food insecurity is often tied to insecure or inadequate access to land.

While some effective tools exist for improving food security, the problem is becoming more challenging. Global population growth and rising wealth are increasing the demand for food, while climate change, resource degradation, and other demands on land are constraining production options. Improving food security at both the global and local level will require land governance that creates incentives for greater productivity and improves access to nutritious food for the poor and vulnerable, without creating further strain on environmental services.

More efficient use of agricultural land can boost crop yields and meet growing global demand for food. Smallholders have a vital role to play, both because they produce much of the world’s food and because they represent a large share of the world’s poor and food insecure. At the local level, land tenure security, along with access to other resources, is linked with increased productivity and investments in land fertility, which in turn can increase food security [3]. What holds for small farmers in general is even more critical for women. Empowering women through more secure land rights and greater control over household decision making not only boosts production of food crops but also leads to improved nutrition for families. However, climate change and resource degradation are reducing yields and available land, threatening to slow or reverse progress on world hunger [4]. Addressing these new challenges requires investment in sustainable and climate-smart intensification. What is needed to improve food security? Natural and social science data, knowledge, and tools will all be essential to address the coming challenges [5]. Solutions will include improved crop varieties and agricultural technologies, and just as importantly, improvements and adaptations in the social and economic systems that link land to food security outcomes, including governance, incentives, markets, and investments.

 

Indicators

Indicator Min-Max
Number of years

Obs missing
Min / Max

This indicator is calculated by FAOSTAT/ESS and is part of the FAO Suite of Food Security Indicators -- Dimension: stability (

Measurement unit
Percentage (3-year average)

The proportion of children under the age of five who suffer from stunting (that is, low height for their age, reflecting chronic undernutrition).

Measurement unit
Percentage

The proportion of children under the age of five who suffer from wasting (that is, low weight for their height, reflecting acute undernutrition)

Measurement unit
Percentage

This indicator is part of the FAO Suite of Food Security Indicators -- Dimension: access (http://www.fao.org/economic/es

Measurement unit
Index

This indicator is part of the FAO Suite of Food Security Indicators -- Dimension: stability (http://www.fao.org/economic

Measurement unit
Index

The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is calculated as the average of three indicators, the proportion of the population that is undernourished (Undernourishment), the proportion of underweight children un

Measurement unit
Index (0; 100)

This indicator is calculated by FAOSTAT/ESS and is part of the FAO Suite of Food Security Indicators -- Dimension: access (

Measurement unit
Millions (3-year average)

This indicator is part of the FAO Suite of Food Security Indicators -- Dimension: access (http://www.fao.org/economic/es

Measurement unit
Percentage

Mapping

Loading map...

The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is calculated as the average of three indicators, the proportion of the population that is undernourished (Undernourishment), the proportion of underweight children un

Ranking

Loading ranking chart

This indicator is calculated by FAOSTAT/ESS and is part of the FAO Suite of Food Security Indicators -- Dimension: access (

Measurement unit
Millions (3-year average)

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parties indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Media

Latest News

18 October 2017
Canada

Pipeline company downplaying major legal and financial risks of crossing unceded First Nations territory in British Columbia

18 October 2017
Cameroon

The third-generation farmers question alleged discrepancy in issuance of permits among different parties to operate on the land.

18 October 2017
Global

The International day of Rural Women, which we celebrate today, is an annual event to recognise the role women play in agriculture and rural development.

In Kenya where the foundation of most communities is agriculture and livestock production, women contribute up to 80 per cent of workforce yet they only hold 1 per cent of registered land in their names and around 5-6 per cent of registered titles are held in joint names (Kenya Land Alliance, 2013).

12 October 2017
Global

Rome—Considerable gains have been made in land-tenure governance in the past five years, but more must be done to improve the lives of billions of people—that was the message at a high-level event cohosted by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the European Union (EU) to mark the fifth anniversary of guidelines to recognize and secure tenure rights.

Latest Blogs

Africa

By Frank Pichel, Interim CEO & Chief Programs Officer, Cadasta Foundation

Across the continent, insecure rights to land are robbing millions of financial stability and long-term prosperity. While new technology is giving people the tools to define what’s theirs, governments must recognize that certainty of ownership is a prerequisite of sustainable development.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Global

By Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Chairman of the Advisory Board of CCSI, University Professor at Columbia University, and Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network

Mali

Farmers in Mali have gained critical new rights to their traditional land—and rural communities have gained much-needed economic stability—as a result of a historic new law.

Latest Events

27 November 2017 to 30 November 2017

Location

Teresina, Piauí, Brasil, 64000-000
Piauí
Brazil
BR
Brazil

A Comissão Organizadora da IV Reunião Nordestina de Ciência do Solo já definiu a data do evento, que ocorrerá entre os dias 27 a 30/11/2017 na cidade de Teresina, PI. Segundo o Coordenador do evento, o Dr. Henrique Antunes de Souza, da Embrapa Meio-Norte, nos próximos dias será disponibilizado o site do evento contendo informações sobre programação, preço das inscrições, modelo de resumo, normas de submissão, etc. A seguir são apresentados os membros que compõem a Comissão Organizadora da IV RNCS:

 

Coordenador

12 October 2017

Location

FAO Headquarters - Iraq Room Rome
Italy
IT
Global

Taking stock of progress and mapping future contributions from development actors

The Land Portal Foundation and the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) are please to invite you to our side event at the Committee on Food Security (CFS) on October 12, 8:30AM - 10:00AM, IRAQ Room,  FAO Headquarters, Rome

11 October 2017 to 14 October 2017

Location

Viana do Castelo
United States
US
Portugal

Desde a sua fundação, em 1984, a Sociedade Portuguesa de Ciências Florestais tem vindo a desenvolver diversas actividades no sentido de fomentar o estudo e progresso da ciência e da técnica florestal entre as quais se destaca a organização dos Congressos Florestais Nacionais.

CFS logo
9 October 2017 to 13 October 2017

Location

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00153 Rome
Italy
IT
Global

The vision of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) is to be the most inclusive international and intergovernmental platform for all stakeholders to work together in a coordinated way to ensure food security and nutrition for all. 

Debates

Closed
19 June 2017 to 14 July 2017
Facilitators
Imma Subirats
malapela.malapela
Global

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in partnership with the Global Data on Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN);the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) the World Bank and the Land Portal are inviting interested individuals to participate on the discussion on ICTs and Open Data in Agriculture and Nutrition.

Closed
5 June 2017 to 16 June 2017
Facilitators
Godfrey Massay
Lukasz Czerwinski
Global
Tanzania

From June 5-16, 2017, Landesa and the Land Portal will co-facilitate a dialogue through which a variety of stakeholders will contribute to discussion on the principles and practices of land-based investments, with a focus on the Tanzanian context. This is intended as part of the broader conversation on responsible investment in land principles, guidelines and practices that has proliferated since, at least, the 2009 food crisis and subsequent ‘land grabs’ that swept the global south

Closed
6 April 2016 to 12 April 2016
Facilitators
Deborah Fulton
Global

 

Dear all,

Urbanization and the transformation of agriculture, food systems and rural spaces present challenges and opportunities for inclusive growth, poverty eradication, economic, environmental and social sustainability, and food security and nutrition. As a result, there is an increasing focus on rural-urban linkages and approaches which can address these issues in a holistic and integrated manner in order to fully address the challenges and maximize the opportunities.

Partners

Library

Displaying 1 - 6 of 1916
Reports & Research
October 2017
Mozambique

This report is a product of a partnership between Terra Firma and the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), contributing to a study of changing land access in sub-Saharan Africa supported by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Jurisprudence
October 2017
Mozambique

O presente relatório inscreve-se nas actividades desenvolvidas no âmbito do Projecto GCP/MOZ/069/NET, estabelecido entre a Organização das Nações Unidas para a Agricultura e a Alimentação (FAO) e o Governo da República de Moçambique, cujo objectivo geral é o de apoiar a implementação de três diplomas legais recentes e inovadores no ordenamento jurídico moçambicano: a Lei de Terras, a Lei do Ambiente e a Lei das Florestas e Fauna Bravia.
Este objectivo geral desdobra-se em quatro objectivos específicos, assim escalonados:

Training Resources & Tools
September 2017
Global

This course has been developed in response to the concerns about increasing large-scale land acquisitions and the need to increase investment in agriculture. The objective is to provide guidance to government authorities engaged in investment promotion, approval, and monitoring activities at all stages of the investment cycle.

Manuals & Guidelines
September 2017
Niger

There are 85 irrigation schemes in Niger that cover around 16,000 ha and are cultivated by 40,000 farmers. The informal status of these irrigation schemes, and their occupants, has created problems due to population growth and the increasing scarcity of natural resources. Holders of traditional land rights have challenged government decisions concerning land attributions and property rights within the schemes, and have occasionally prevented construction from proceeding.

Manuals & Guidelines
September 2017
Niger

Le Niger compte aujourd’hui 85 aménagements hydro-agricoles (AHA), qui s’étendent sur environ 16 000 hectares et font travailler plus de 40 000 exploitants.  Avec la pression démographique et la raréfaction des ressources naturelles disponibles pour l’activité agricole, l’informalité de la gestion du foncier des AHA et du statut des personnes qui les exploitent est devenue problématique.

Reports & Research
September 2017
Burkina Faso

Le développement de l’irrigation fait partie des stratégies prioritaires dans les pays du Sahel pour lutter contre la pauvreté et l’insécurité alimentaire. À l’heure où les gouvernements s’engagent, une fois de plus, à augmenter les superficies irrigables, il a semblé pertinent d’analyser, conformément aux lignes directrices de la CEDEAO, les résultats obtenus sur des grands périmètres aménagés dans les années 80 et 90 afin d’en tirer les leçons pour les aménagements futurs.